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Regenerative medicine

With the promise to treat, manage or cure some of the most devastating and costly diseases in the world today, the Canadian pioneers in regenerative medicine are disrupting the traditional health industries with the promise of revolutionary new cures for heart disease, diabetes, cancer and more.

 

Leaders:

Vancouver, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Québec City

Success stories:

Among the full complement of cell biology research tools in STEMCELL Technologies’ Vancouver arsenal is CAR T-cell therapy, a rapidly emerging immunotherapy that seeks out and destroys cancerous cells to effectively target and treat types of leukemia.

 

TORONTO IS AT THE FOREFRONT OF RESEARCH IN REGENERATIVE MEDICINE

In 1961, Toronto scientists James Till, a biophysicist, and Ernest McCulloch, a haematologist, published findings in Radiation Research that proved the existence of stem cells — cells that can self-renew repeatedly for various uses. Their pioneering work continues through the researchers at the Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine and at Toronto’s Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, a world leader in stem cell research and the largest integrated cancer research, teaching and treatment centre in Canada.

 

NETWORKS OF EXPERTS ACROSS CANADA

With a vision to transform the treatment of incurable diseases, the Ontario Institute for Regenerative Medicine is making Ontario a global leader in the development and dissemination of stem cell-based products and therapies. The Stem Cell Network in Ottawa is a national non-profit that supports stem cell and regenerative medicine research, training the next generation and providing outreach across Canada.

 

LEADING RESEARCHERS

The Alberta Diabetes Institute in Edmonton is a state-of-the-art facility studying islet cell biology and physiology, plus immunology and cell therapies amongst others. Québec City’s Laboratoire d'organogénèse expérimentale is one of the first laboratories in the world to perform organ reconstruction through tissue engineering with normal human cells.